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Interesting links

Here are a few interesting links that I thought you might enjoy. Is it way past time you finished that novel you’ve been carrying around in your head? Try this article for inspiration! https://www.theguardian.com/books/ng-interactive/2017/mar/20/how-to-finish-a-novel-tracking-book-progress-wyl-menmuir Peter Swanson, author of The Kind Worth Killing describes his perfect reader perfectly! ‘They have no gender or age, but they are in for the night, and looking to get lost in, and maybe a little scared by, a book.’ Sounds good to me! https://www.ft.com/content/e9c39ac4-f529-11e6-95ee-f14e55513608 An interesting and timely read? I think so: Margaret Atwood on what The Handmaid’s Tale means in the Age of Trump http://nyti.ms/2mo9wkr If you have any interesting links you would like to share, just let me know!

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A Writer Reads

I have read some wonderful books recently, but there are three which stand out for me. Dead Woman Walking – I was lucky enough to get an advance copy of this excellent novel by Sharon Bolton, and as many of you know she is one of my favourite authors. It begins with a dramatic hot-air balloon ride and a view from above of a killer. With a twist that I genuinely didn’t see coming, the tension never drops until the last page. Although not published yet, Dead Woman Walking is available for pre-order. https://www.amazon.co.uk/Dead-Woman-Walking-Sharon-Bolton-ebook/dp/B01KL65GTM/         Wrong Place – Having read and thoroughly enjoyed Michelle Davies’ first novel, Gone Astray, I was keen to read the next story in the DC Maggie Neville series. Neville is a Family Liaison Officer, and this gives a unique spin to a police procedural. Wrong Place is the story of a woman

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Christmas with bestselling author Sharon Bolton

I can’t tell you how thrilled I was when Sharon Bolton agreed to be interviewed for my newsletter and blog. I have been a fan since I read Sacrifice about eight years ago. Since then, I have devoured every single book she has written and enjoyed them all. Read on to find out more about this wonderful author and her views on Christmas.     What do you think is the best thing about Christmas? The way it turns the darkest of seasons beautiful. I just love the look of Christmas: twinkling lights in the black sky, sumptuously wrapped presents, wreathes on cottage doors, exquisitely decorated trees and tables groaning under piles of delicious food. One of the great joys of Christmas for me is making my home beautiful for the holiday, and seeing my neighbours do the same. What will you be eating for Christmas lunch, and are you

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Special Book Offers

This month there are some great special offers on some of my books, one in the UK and two in the US. UK offer The Back Road – my second novel – has over 1300 FIVE STAR reviews in the UK and for this month only it is on offer at 99p – which is over 70% off! A girl lies close to death in a dark, deserted lane. A driver drags her body to the side of the road. A shadowy figure hides in the trees, watching and waiting. The quietest places hide the darkest secrets. Click here to learn more.     US offers The Back Road is also available to US readers too (although as you see, the cover is a bit different!) Just $2. Click here to learn more.       Only the Innocent – the book which introduces readers to DCI Tom Douglas is

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A Writer Writes – December 2016

In October’s post about writing, I talked about the editing process, and mentioned that I read my whole manuscript out loud when I get near to the final version. I have always done this, and highly recommend it. But it was only when I was going through my new book that I was reminded why it’s so effective. The eye skims over words, and so it helps with spotting errors, but the most important benefit, as I discovered this time, was finding repeat words. It may be that the same word or phrase is used several pages apart, but when reading out loud I find that I ‘hear’ it, much more accurately than I ‘see’ it. It’s not the wrong word, so it wouldn’t stand out normally. But if you listen to your own voice (or maybe even record yourself) your book will be all the better for it. If

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Christmas Links

A festive treats for you! Whether you are looking for something to read, want to escape, or you’re thinking of making the most of 2017, we have some suggestions for you. Best 100 Books for Christmas. Doing exactly what it says on the tin, The Telegraph gives you a luxuriously long list of Christmas beauties on paper. The Best Places to Spend Christmas. All worn out by the thought of hanging stockings, lighting fires or stuffing turkeys? Get away from it all with these suggestions. Get a head start on your New Year’s resolution to become an international best-seller. Check out The Guardian on art holidays and creative writing retreats.

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Featured Cake

It’s Christmas, so this week’s featured reader is actually a FEATURED CAKE! We like the blood red colouring, here at Team Abbott – it could disguise a multitude of sins!! Christmas Velvet Cake Ingredients Cake: 0.5 cup butter 1.5 cups sugar 2 eggs 2.5 cups all-purpose flour 1 cup buttermilk 2 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa 2 tablespoons red food coloring 2 teaspoons baking powder 2 tablespoons cider vinegar Frosting: 1.3 cups semi-skimmed milk 7 tablespoons all-purpose flour 1.3 cups salted butter, softened 1.3 to 2 cups icing sugar, sifted 1.5 teaspoons vanilla extract Instructions To prepare cake, preheat oven to 350F. Grease three 8-inch layer pans or two 9-inch layer pans; line bottoms with greaseproof paper. In a mixing bowl, beat together butter and sugar. Add eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition. Add flour alternately with buttermilk; beat until blended. In a small bowl, whisk cocoa and

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A Writer Reads – December 2016

I love Maeve Binchy, if at any stage I need I reassuringly accomplished read I turn to her. For this Christmas I would recommend A Week in Winter. It is set in one of her familiar small towns on the west coast of Ireland where everyone knows everyone else, perhaps a bit too well. The main character Chicky Starr lives in a decaying mansion set high on the cliffs overlooking the windswept Atlantic Ocean and turn it into a restful place for a holiday by the sea, everyone thinks she is eccentric at best. But Chicky, who has just returned from something of a veiled existence in America, sets about rebuilding her life and she is not short of other eccentric individuals to help her – look out for the clairvoyant librarian among many others. This is Maeve Binchy’s last novel and has been described as sketchier than some of

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Dying to Write – December 2016

Those of you who have been reading the newsletter each month will know that we have been running a writing competition. I wrote the first paragraph and then asked readers to write the second and subsequent paragraphs. We have had some terrific entries, and have drawn the competition to a close this month with a paragraph by Carolyn Mahony. I have added a concluding chapter, and the whole story can be read below. If you think you have a good title for this short story, send it to newsletter@rachel-abbott.com to win a signed paperback of Kill Me Again Here’s the story and thanks so much to all of you for your inspiration! Opening paragraph Friday the 13th was the day that my world fell apart. I hadn’t been expecting it. I was happily splashing a lovely stone coloured emulsion onto the rough plastered walls of my tiny cottage, singing along

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Scary Music from Rachel’s Video Producer Trevor Jenkins

Part of the joy of being a self-published author is the variety of people I get to meet. This month let me introduce Trevor Jenkins, the music producer behind my last three video trailers. In conversation, it became clear that he’d had a couple of spooky experiences so I asked him to share them for Halloween. If you do nothing else this Halloween, listen to the audio track at the end of this article and tell us what you make of it. It made my blood run cold! Having made some original music inspired by three of Rachel’s superb novels, we started to talk about the creative DNA of music and drama and it’s emotional impact. It’s a powerful alchemy. Imagine Hitchcock without Herrmann or the opening scenes from Jaws without the strings? The virgin listener to Tubular Bells will hear not a note of menace within the music but